The Playmaker Project

How to Improve Elasticity and Explosiveness | Athlete Training

GOAL:  The Goal of this article is to challenge you to spend 5 minutes in the morning and 5 minutes in the evening training your fascia.  This will improve your speed, power, elasticity, and range of motion.  Let’s get better today!

WHAT IS FASCIA?

Fascia is the word is we use for all connective tissue in the body. Fascia is the most prevalent tissue in the body. Fascia connects to and influences every system in the body.  When doing athlete training and sports training it is mission-critical that fascia is a focal point.

THE GLIDING AND SLIDING OF FASCIA

What does the word Viscosity mean?

Viscosity is the ability of our tissues to slide against one another. Remember fascia is a connective tissue that influences every system in our body.

The connective tissue in our body slides and glides against each other. This is a good thing because we want our fascia to glide smoothly over the muscle. When our fascia gets tight and clumps up it impacts athlete training and performance goes down.

Athletes gain added power and speed from increased viscoelasticity. Without an ability to glide smoothly fascia becomes constricted in its ability to produce force.

HOW CAN ATHLETES TRAIN THEIR FASCIA
TO INCREASE ELASTICITY AND EXPLOSIVENESS?

When we stretch our fascia tissue consciously and correctly over time, we can develop robust connective tissue that has tremendous resilience and viscosity. We need to train this accordingly because our BODY RESPONDS TO DEMAND.

THE GREAT 8 STRETCHES FOR FASCIA MOBILITY

The following 8 fascia stretches if done consistently can help increase your range of motion and elasticity.  Again just like with everything with your athlete training, BE CONSISTANT:)

I discovered these stretches in the Amazing book “Stretch to Win” by Chris and Ann Frederick. Chris and Ann are 2 Incredible Fascia Performance teachers and they have a ton of amazing content on their website.

CheckemOut!

These 8 Great Stretches for Fascia Mobility take 3 to 6 minutes to complete. I have been doing them first thing in the morning after I meditate and at night about an hour before bed as part of my nighttime ritual.

SPORTS TRAINING | THE GREAT 8 STRETCHES FOR FASCIA ELASTICITY

CRAZY POWERFUL GLUTE STRETCH
FOR THE POWER, LATERAL, AND BACK FASCIA NETS

INSTRUCTIONS

1.  Sit on the floor and bend both knees and position your feet on the floor wider than your hips.

2.  Use your hands to support you behind your back.

3.  Then perform a hip warm-up by rocking the knees from side to side with the movement coming from the hips, not the knees. (see picture 1.1 A)

4. Next place one leg in front and one leg behind, and bring the front foot inward until the foot touches the back knee (see picture 1.1 B). Position your weight so you are sitting on the glute of the front leg. Place your hands in a push-up position in front of you with your arms straight.

5. As you inhale, lengthen the whole spine up through the top of your head; then
exhale and move down and forward over the knee, keeping your spine long
(see picture 1.1 C).

6. Repeat, taking the torso forward to the left and right of the knee at different angles to target the different glute fibers.

ELITE QUALITY QUADRATUS LUMBORUM
STRETCH FOR THE DEEP FRONT AND LATERAL NETS |

INSTRUCTIONS

1. From the glute stretch position, walk the hands back until you feel a slight stretch in the back, hips, or legs (see picture 1.2a).
2. Keep the hands still and lean toward the hand that is on the same side as the front leg, and inhale (see picture 1.2b).
3. Exhale as you lean into the hand on the same side as the back leg and slightly behind the elbow (see picture 1.2c).
4. Repeat

ATHLETE TRAINING TIP
* Walk your hands out a little farther with each repetition to progress the stretch.

INCREDIBLE IILIOPSOAS STRETCH
FOR THE DEEP FRONT FASCIA NET
ATHLETE TRAINING TO IMPROVE ELASTICITY

INSTRUCTIONS

1. From last position in the previous QL stretch, place the back forearm on the ground and find a stable position where you can balance on that arm with full weight. Slide the forearm to the rear as your back starts to arch, and stop when you feel a mild stretch. Inhale and lean forward on both hands
(see picture 1.3a).
2. Exhale while you arch the back and look up to the ceiling (see picture 1.3b).
3. Repeat

TALENT DEVELOPMENT FASCIA TRAINING TIPS
* Lean back farther to progress the stretch.
* Turn the chest toward the floor then toward the ceiling to stretch different angles.
* Find the stretch by arching the back rather than twisting it.

LIFE-CHANGING LATISSIMUS DORSI STRETCH
FOR THE BACK POWER AND ARM FASCIA NETS

INSTRUCTIONS

1. From the last position in the previous hip flexor stretch, inhale and reach your arm overhead (see picture 1.4a).
2. Extend the arm out from the hip as you reach. This looks like you are swimming in the air (see picture 1.4b).

3. Exhale as you rotate the chest toward the floor while you reach the arm out
(see picture 1.4c).

4. Circle your arm down and back up overhead.
5. Repeat

ATHLETE TRAINING TIP
* Keep reaching the arm throughout the stretch for maximal effect.
Try to get the chest more parallel to the floor with each rep.

POWERFUL PECTORALIS MINOR STRETCH
FOR THE DEEP FRONT ARM FASCIA NET

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Stand in a split stance with the feet slightly wider than hip distance apart and with the arm on the front-leg side in a high Y position or closer to the head in an I position as tolerated (see figure 2.1a).
2. Reach the working arm out at 90 degrees to the side with the fingers pointing back if possible (see figure 2.1b).

3. Reach the working arm back and down toward the floor with the palm facing back as you reach each arm slightly behind your body with the palm of your hand facing back (see pictures 2.1c).

4. Ensure that the fingers are always pointing back to increase the target of the fascia tissue.

TALENT DEVELOPMENT FASCIA TRAINING TIPS
* Stay facing forward with your chest square while reaching back with the arm.
* Square the hips to the chest and keep the leg opposite to the arm being stretched back and behind the body.

REMARKABLE ROTATOR CUFF STRETCH
FOR THE DEEP BACK ARM FASCIAL NET

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Stand with feet hip distance apart and reach the arms up in the shape of a backwards L.
2. Rotate the Arms Up and Down, see pictures 2.2a and 2.2b.
3. Gently push into your end range until the tissue releases and opens up.

TALENT DEVELOPMENT FASCIA TRAINING TIPS
* Push yourself to increase your range of motion.

LAID BACK LEVATOR SCAPULAE STRETCH
FOR THE DEEP BACK ARM FASCIA NET

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Stand with the feet hip-distance apart. Grasp one wrist and pull it behind the back and down toward the floor (see picture 2.4a).
2. Turn the head away from the arm being grasped behind the body, and look down toward the floor over the opposite foot. Bring the chin down to the chest until you feel the stretch (see picture 2.4b).

3. Look up at the ceiling and back down again a few times to play with the angles of the fascia tissue (see pictures 2.4c-d).

4. Release the wrist.

ATHLETE TRAINING TIP
* You can hold on to a tool, such as a towel or stick, with the hands apart if you experience a flexibility challenge. Progress to getting the hands closer as you gain mobility.

RIDICULOUS RHOMBOID STRETCH
FOR THE DEEP BACK ARM NET

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Begin on your hands and knees with the hands under the shoulders and the knees approximately hip-distance apart.
2. Bend forward from the hips, and thread one arm behind the other with the palm facing up on the floor. (See picture 2.5 a). Continue reaching the arm across the body to the target area.
3. Lower the body toward the ground to increase the stretch (see picture 2.5 b). Press into the floor with the other hand to stabilize. Keep your core sturdy.

ATHLETE TRAINING TIP
* To increase your range of motion in the stretch, lean forward into the shoulder more and reach while you stretch in the exhalation.
Data is showing that traditional athlete training and its focus on training for speed via more strength training is often slowing athletes down, and that training the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems without recognizing the significant role the fascia system plays in sports increases the risk for injury, especially overuse and connective tissue injuries often seen in basketball, baseball, soccer, and football.

That’s not what we want.

Cutting edge sports science is showing that our connective tissue network or “fascia system” is far more responsible for storing, releasing, and transferring elastic energy through the body than was previously understood, and that three-dimensional, whole-system training of these connective tissues using dynamic natural movements can help athletes achieve better performance while greatly reducing their injury risk.    You can train your fascia network by doing these stretches every day.  5 minutes in the morning, 5 minutes at night:)

Let’s get better today,
Coach Jackson
Premier Speed Academy
Change of Direction University
Champion School.
Fast Twitch Prep.

 

Coach Jackson
Coach Jackson
Master’s Degrees in Education (Specializing in the Work of Abraham Maslow and Human Potential) and an MBA in International Leadership and Coaching. He is a N.A.S.E certified Speed and Explosion Specialist and Optimize Coach.
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